The Royal Hampshire Regiment’s Timeline

The list is constantly evolving and will be added to on a regular basis, particularly to include more recent events

Click a date below to go to that specific section of the timeline.

1700
  • 1702
    Painting of Thomas Meredith

    Meredith's

    The 37th Foot Regiment (later the 1st Battalion The Hampshire Regiment) was formed on 13th February, 1702 by Colonel Thomas Meredith.

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  • 1702
    Map of Europe

    The War of the Spanish Succession

    The War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) has been described as ‘the first world war of modern times’ with major campaigns fought in Spain, Italy and Germany as well as at sea.

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  • 1704
    The Battle of Blenheim, 1704

    The Battle of Blenheim

    The Battle of Blenheim fought on 13th August, 1704 was one of the turning points of the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-14), saving Vienna from the Franco-Bavarian army and preventing the collapse of the Grand Alliance.

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  • 1706
    The Battle of Ramillies, 1706

    The Battle of Ramillies

    The Battle of Ramillies fought on May 23, 1706 was an overwhelming victory for the Grand Alliance forces of England, Holland and Denmark over the army of King Louis XIV of France during the war of the Spanish Succession (1701-14).

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  • 1708
    The Battle of Oudenarde, 1708

    The Battle of Oudenarde

    The Battle of Oudenarde (in present day Belgium) was fought on 11th July 1708 between the Grand Alliance forces of Britain, Holland and Austria on the one side and those of King Louis XIV of France on the other during the War of the Spanish Succession.

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  • 1709
    The Battle of Malplaquet, 1709

    The Battle of Malplaquet

    The Duke of Marlborough’s fourth and final victory of the War of the Spanish Succession came at the Battle of Malplaquet, fought on 11th September 1709 between the forces of the Grand Alliance and France.

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  • 1711
    to-quebec-preview

    To Quebec, wrecked in the St Lawrence

    Tory hostility to Marlborough had centred on his concentrating British energies in Flanders at the expense of diversionary attacks on the French and their allies elsewhere in the world. To that end the new Tory government dispatched five regiments, among the Windress’, to North America in 1711 to help the British colonists in the fight against their French neighbours in Canada.

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  • 1743
    preview-battle-of-dettingen

    Battle of Dettingen

    In 1740 Europe was engulfed by war once more when France, Saxony, Prussia and Bavaria repudiated the Pragmatic Sanction of 1713 by which the Austrian Emperor Charles VI had attempted to secure the succession of his daughter Maria Theresa to all his Habsburg lands. The War of the Austrian Succession pitted these powers against Britain, Hanover and Austria.

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  • 1746
    Culloden

    Battle of Culloden

    On 16th April 1746 the Jacobite Rebellion was brought to an end at the battle between the Highland Army of Prince Charles Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) and the Royal Troops of King George II. The Royal victory secured the House of Hanover on the English throne. The 8,000 Royal troops were commanded by the King’s son, William, Duke of Cumberland. His cousin, Prince Charles, led the 7,000-strong Highland force.

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  • 1756
    formation 23rd

    Formation of the 2/37th

    In early 1756, as Britain’s relations with France continued to be strained, the army was authorised to raise ten new regiments. As part of this expansion, the 37th provided men to Brudenell’s, then numbered 53rd, which became the 51st Regiment (K.O.Y.L.I.). ‘Brudenell’s’ were to fight alongside the 37th in the Westphalia campaign and to share with them the laurels of Minden..

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  • 1757

    Formation of the North and South Hampshire Militia

    A convenient marker point to positively identify the County’s (Southampton) Militia was the Militia Act of Charles II in 1661 which acknowledged emphatically the King’s sole right to control the Militia – this act provided for the levying of the Militia by the Lords Lieutenant and for its organisation by Companies and Regiments.

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  • 1758
    Formation of the 67th Foot

    Formation of the 67th Foot

    On 21st April 1758 the 2nd battalions were separated from their original corps and numbered as separate units from the 61st onwards. The 2/20th became the 67th with Wolfe as its first Colonel. The new regiment’s officers all came from the 20th and most had only recently been promoted or commissioned.

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  • 1759
    battle-of-minden

    Battle of Minden

    Throughout the Seven Years War, 1759 was heralded as the ‘Year of Victories’; Britain, Prussia and Portugal were allied against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden and Poland. The Battle of Minden was to be the first time that dismounted infantry had ever beaten massed bands of cavalry.

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  • 1761
    capture-of-belle-isle

    Capture of Belle Isle

    The capture of the French island of Belle Isle, 20 miles off the Brittany coast, was a joint naval/army expedition during the Seven Years War. The war had begun in 1756 following clashes in North America before the focus switched to Europe, with France seizing the island of Minorca while Britain, encouraged by the Southern Secretary William Pitt, launched a series of naval attacks on the French coast, including the Raid on Rochefort (1757) and the Raid on Cherbourg (1758).

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  • 1764
    death-of-thomas-thetcher

    Death of Thomas Thetcher

    To members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) the name Thomas Thetcher, a grenadier in the North Regiment of the Hants Militia, is synonymous with the foundation of their organisation. But the curious link between Thetcher’s grave in the churchyard of Winchester Cathedral and AA is less well known to the wider public.

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  • 1776
    war-of-independence

    American War of Independence

    The Treaty of Paris of 1763 which ended the Seven Years War left Britain in control of Canada and the 13 American colonies. Politically and culturally, Britain and the colonies seemed very close, but the picture changed rapidly in the 1770s. Several reasons lay behind this.

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  • 1776
    the-37th-foot-in-america1775

    The 37th Foot in America

    The 37th were ordered out to America in November 1775 as part of a substantial British force. The 477-strong regiment included 20 men from Brunswick and Hesse, these German states supplying some 2,000 soldiers for the expedition.

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  • 1782
    north-and-south-hampshire-regiments

    The 37th Foot and 67th Foot become the North and South Hampshire Regiment

    On 31st August 1782 British army regiments were directed to assume county titles and to start building up recruiting connections within their counties. This was the result of measures taken during the war with America to encourage recruiting.

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  • 1786

    The Court Martial of Captain Robert Hedges

    The Court Martial of Captain Robert Hedges, of the 67th Regiment, took place in St John’s, Antigua, between 30th January and 13th March 1786. Two charges were brought against Hodges by his commanding officer, Major Browne.

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  • 1803
    raising-of-the-67th

    Raising of the 2/67th

    The 2/67th was formed under the Army of Reserve Act of July 1803 to counter the renewed threat from Napoleonic France. The Act allowed 50,000 troops to be raised and formed into 2nd battalions of existing regiments.

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  • 1805
    India 67th

    The 67th moves to India

    In April 1805 the 67th was selected for service in India, where several regiments were overdue relief.  It was to remain on the sub-continent until 1826 and earn the nickname ‘The Tigers’.

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  • 1810
    2/67th under Lieutenant Colonel William Prevost

    The 2/67th at Cadiz and Barossa

    Six companies of the 2/67th under Lieutenant Colonel William Prevost arrived at Cadiz in December 1810 (four companies remained in England) to find the garrison besieged by a powerful French army.

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  • 1819

    Capture of Assighur by the 67th

    The capture of the formidable fortress of Assighur, the ‘Gibraltar of the East’, came at the end of the campaigns against the Pindaris and Mahrattas in India between 1817 and 1819.

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  • 1826

    The 67th return to England after 21 years and authorisation to carry the Royal Bengal Tiger on the Regimental Colours

    In February 1826, after spells in Sholapore and Poona, the regiment was sent to Rangoon to reinforce British troops engaged in the Burmese war.

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  • 1833

    Ireland, Barbados and British Guyana

    In February 1833 the service companies moved from Gibraltar to Barbados where they arrived on 29th March. In the autumn two companies were detached to Grenada, a third following in January 1834.

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  • 1857

    The 37th and the Indian Mutiny

    The Indian Mutiny was a rebellion against the rule of the British East India Company that ran from May 1857 to July 1859.

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  • 1859

    Formation of the Hampshire Rifle Volunteers and the Administrative Battalions

    The war scare of 1859 brought a sudden realisation to the country that its defences were inadequate, and public opinion was so aroused that the government agreed to the Volunteer Corps, disbanded in 1814, being reformed.

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  • 1860

    Taku Forts

    The 67th (South Hampshire) Regiment who had been called in as reinforcements for the assault on the Taku Forts from behind, to avoid a defeat as had been seen the previous year, and by the end of the battle were to have won four Victoria Crosses.

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  • 1864

    The 67th in Yokohama, Japan

    The detachment of the 67th took no part in this action, instead remaining at Yokohama until December 1864. Its presence there had a salutary and sobering effect on the anti-foreign faction.

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  • 1872

    The 67th in Burma

    The 67th had been home for six years when, in September 1872, it received orders to move to Burma. Eight companies under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Frederick Jebb embarked the troopship HMS Malabar at Portsmouth, while two remained at Shorncliffe as a depot.

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  • 1878

    The 67th Regiment and the Second Afghan War

    On 20th November 1878 three British forces invaded Afghanistan from India. Afghan resistance was mixed but eventually overcome and in May 1879 (following the death of Sher Ali) the two sides signed a treaty at Gundamuk which allowed the British to take the Khyber Pass and the Kurum Valley and to establish a mission in Kabul.

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  • 1881

    The 37th and 67th united as the Hampshire Regiment

    The Hampshire Regiment – an amalgamation of the 37th and 67th – was created under the Childers scheme following the earlier Cardwell reforms, which had allowed soldiers to join their local regiment. Significant alterations in establishment accompanied the 1881 reorganisation. Battalions now had two Lieutenant Colonels, three or four Majors, four or five Captains, 16 subalterns, an Adjutant and a Quartermaster.

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  • 1885

    King Theebaw and the Third Anglo Burmese War

    In October 1884 the French declared that they would be happy to share Burma with the British, this was not acceptable to the British who issued the Burmese an ultimatum about the teak logging rights. This was to the effect that the Burmese should compensate the British for losses and that the King would have to accept an ambassador and occupying troops.

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  • 1899

    Death of Lieutenant Colonel Edward H Le Marchant

    On 23rd March, the Battalion commander, Lieutenant Colonel Edward Henry Le Marchant, was shot dead by a ghazi.

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  • 1899

    The 2nd Hampshire and the Boer War

    The Boer War of 1899-1902 was preceded by more than a century of conflict between the Boers (Dutch settlers) and the British Empire.

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  • 1902

    The Barberton Rail Crash

    On the 24th March 1902, orders were received for the 2nd Hampshire, then quartered at Barberton, to proceed to Johannesburg.

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  • 1903

    Aden and Somaliland

    In an attempt to protect the route to India, 1st Hampshire were deployed to Aden and Somaliland to police the entrance to the Suez Canal

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  • 1908

    Formation of the Territorial Force

    The Territorial Force (TF), which existed from 1908 to 1920, was the volunteer reserve element of the British Army. It was created under the Territorial and Reserve Forces Act of 1907, brought in by the Secretary of State for War Richard Haldane.

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  • 1914

    The Outbreak of the First World War

    War was declared on 4th August and on 23rd August 1st Hampshire deployed to France and fought its first battle at Le Cateau on 26th August.  3 days later the Commanding Officer Lt Col SCF Jackson was captured and spent the rest of the War in captivity.

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  • 1914

    The Territorial Battalions deploy to India

    At the outbreak of the First World War much of the British Regular Army was stationed in India and needed to be replaced by Territorials from Britain. India was known as ‘the Jewel in the Crown’ due to its colonial and trading importance and needed to be protected at all costs.

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  • 1914

    The Battles of the Marne and the Aisne

    After the retreat from Le Cateau, southwards towards Paris, 1st Hampshire then took part in the Allied counter-offences on the Marne and Aisne rivers.  These battles effectively ended Germany’s hopes for a swift victory on the Western Front.

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  • 1914

    The Defence of Ploegsteert Wood by 1st Hampshire

    Towards the end of 1914, the momentum of the German advance was coming to an end and 1st Hampshire found themselves at Ploegsteert Wood (known as Plugstreet Wood) just to the south of Ypres, where they held the position against sizeable odds. Here Lieutenant William Trimmer was killed while gallantly leading his platoon when it was overrun.

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  • 1915

    The Dardanelles

    During 1915 the Navy were ordered to create an opening to the Black Sea, capture Constantinople and provide a supply route to Russia via the Port of Odessa and also go ‘around the back’ of the German positions on the Western Front.

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  • 1915

    The Second Battle of Ypres

    Second Ypres lasted from April to June 1915 and is best remembered for the first use of gas by the Germans in WW1

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  • 1915

    Mesopotamia

    The campaign in Mesopotamia, which is now modern day Iraq, was fought primarily between the British Empire and the Ottoman Empire in late 1915, and into 1916.

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  • 1915

    Salonika

    In October 1915 English and French forces landed in Salonika, a Greek port. These troops had been sent to provide military assistance to the Serbians following an attack by Austro-Hungarian and Bulgarian troops.

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  • 1916

    The Somme

    For several months, the Germans had been attacking the French at Verdun who were suffering heavy losses. To ease the pressure, the British agreed to attack the Germans north of Verdun in order to draw some Germans away from the French. The Campaign which was to last from 1st July to 18th November involved 5 Hampshire Battalions and cost around 1,300 Hampshire Regiment lives.

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  • 1917

    Arras

    Between 9th April and 16th May 1917 the British attacked German army defences near Arras in France in a plan to engage them on open ground.

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  • 1917

    3rd Ypres

    The Third Ypres, from July to November 1917 was also known ‘Passchendaele’ and was an Allied assault on German lines in Flanders whose aim was to break-through German defences and destroy German submarine bases on the Belgian coast; it failed to achieve this.

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  • 1917

    Palestine

    8th  Hampshire reached El Arish, on the coastline of Egypt, February 25th 1917. The Fifty-Fourth Division was left at Gaza, meaning the 8th Hampshires remained in Gaza, while the 2/4th and 2/5th Hampshire took part in further operation.

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  • 1917

    Aden

    In 1918, the 1st/7th Hampshire reached Aden, where they helped to defuse part of the ‘local war’ between the Turks and troops in Aden, which had been happening since 1915, since Turkey had entered the War.

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  • 1918

    Persia

    In January 1918, the 1/4th Hampshire entered into Persia to support the White Russians and in order to secure the oil wells in Baku, or at least deny them from the enemy.

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  • 1918

    The Final Advance: Western Front - Background

    The period 8th August – 11th November 1918, commonly known as the ‘Final Advance’ or the ‘Hundred Days’

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  • 1918

    The Final Advance - Phase One

    The Elimination of the Salients: 8th August – 14th September 1918

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  • 1918

    The Final Advance - Phase Two

    Breaking the Hindenburg Line and the Advance to Victory:

    27th September – 11th November 1918

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  • 1919

    2nd Hampshire in Russia

    Demobilisation started in the last days of 1918. As part of this the 2nd Hampshire were being detailed for reduction to cadre, a small group of people specially trained for a particular purpose.

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  • 1919

    1/9th Hampshire in Russia

    By the end of 1918, having spent most of the war in India, comprising of 32 officers and 945 other ranks, with the commanding officer Lt Col Robert Johnson they were sent as reinforcements for the British in Russia.

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  • 1919

    Irish War of Independence

    The Irish Republican Party on 21st January 1919 declared independence from Great Britain.

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  • 1936

    Palestine

    Following the end of World War One and the Versailles Peace Treaty, Britain was responsible for the mandate of Palestine.

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  • 1939

    Training at Home

    On 1st Aril 1939 the order was given to double the size of the Territorial Army.  The 4th Hampshire became the 1/4th in central Hampshire and the 2/4th in the north of the county.

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  • 1939

    Dunkirk

    The 2nd Hampshire left for France as part of the 1st Division which formed a major part of the British Expeditionary Force.

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  • 1940

    11th (Royal Militia Island of Jersey) Battalion

    On 21st June 1940 SS Hodder arrived in Southampton Water, carrying 11 Officers and 193 Other Ranks of the Royal Jersey Militia.

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  • 1941

    The Siege of Malta

    On 21st February the 1st Hampshire left Egypt for Malta to be part of the Malta Infantry Brigade, serving with 2nd Devons and 1st Dorsets.

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  • 1942

    The Battle of Tebourba Gap

    2nd Hampshire sailed for North Africa on 11th November 1942, arriving in Algiers on 21st.

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  • 1943

    The Battle of Sidi Nsir, Tunisia

    The 128th Brigade as part of 46th Division, left UK for North Africa on 6th January to reinforce the meagre and tired 1st Army.

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  • 1943

    The Salerno Landings

    Having defeated the Germans in Sicily, it was now time for the Allies to turn their attention to Italy. Within 24 hours of landing at Salerno the Italians surrendered.

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  • 1944

    D Day

    When the 1st Hampshire left its sealed camp in the New Forest on 31st May 1944 bound for the port of Southampton, it was with the purpose of assaulting the enemy’s defences at Arromanches for ‘Operation Overlord’.

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  • 1944

    The Story of Fritz the Dog

    Fritz was a German military Pyrrenean Mountain Dog captured by Captain Cecil Thomas DSO and his platoon during the D Day Landings on 6th June 1944.

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  • 1944

    7th Hampshire in North West Europe

    After landing on 22th June 1944, 7th Hampshire would go on to fight bitter battles in Normandy before crossing the River Seine at the end of August.  Next they took part in Operation Market Garden in Holland before entering Germany, celebrating VE Day near Bremerhaven.

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  • 1946

    Palestine

    Instead of peace in Palestine, the conclusion of World War II brought renewed troubles to the area and once again there was a need for the county regiment to maintain internal security.

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  • 1946

    The Territorial Battalions Post War

    The end of the War in Europe saw 128 Brigade with the 1/4th and 5th Hampshire going into Austria to guard the Austrian/Yugoslav border, to keep the peace and deal with the many displaced persons.

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  • 1954

    Malaya

    A State of Emergency was declared in Malaya 18 June 1948 following attacks on planters by Malay Chinese Terrorists.

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  • 1955

    Ulu Langat Operation

    This is the story of an action fought near the village of Ulu Langat in Selangor, Malaya resulting in the killing of 11 Communist Terrorists (CTs) and the capture of a twelfth.

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  • 1960

    The Caribbean

    On 3rd February 1960 1st Royal Hampshire sailed from Southampton on HMT Dunera for the West Indies.

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  • 1966

    Borneo

    The Indonesian–Malaysian Confrontation during 1963–1966 was an undeclared ‘limited’ war aimed against the new Malaysian Federation by Indonesia.

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  • 1968

    UN Tour of Cyprus

    The 1st Battalion formed part of the multinational United Nations Force in Cyprus (UNIFCYP) from October 1968 to March 1969.

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  • 1947 - 1989

    The Cold War

    Between 1947 and 1991 The Cold War was a sustained state of political and military tension between powers in the Western Bloc, dominated by the USA with NATO among its allies, and the Eastern Bloc, dominated by the Soviet Union along with the Warsaw Pact.

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  • 1969 - 1991

    Northern Ireland

    The ‘Troubles’ in Northern Ireland last from 1968 until 1998 following the Good Friday Agreement. Up to our amalgamation in 1992 The Royal Hampshire Regiment completed either tours of the Province, two of which were residential ie our families came too.

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  • 1979

    Londonderry Roulement Tour

    The 4th Roulement Tour of Northern Ireland (unaccompanied) that 1st Royal Hampshire was to undertake was in the City Centre of Londonderry; the place where ‘the Troubles’ had first started in 1969.

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  • 1982

    Fermanagh Roulement Tour

    The 5th unaccompanied tour of Northern Ireland for 1st Royal Hampshire began in January 1982

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  • 1982

    Falkland Islands and South Georgia

    With the Falklands Conflict being over in the summer of 1982, 1st Royal Hampshire who had not long returned from a tour of Fermanagh found themselves being sent to the Falklands for a 6 month tour as Garrison Battalion with responsibility for South Georgia as well.

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  • 1992

    Amalgamation with The Queen's Regiment

    As a consequence of the end of the Cold War, the Government saw an opportunity to reduce the size of the British Armed Forces, this was carried out under the Study entitled ‘Options for Change’. On 9th September The Royal Hampshire Regiment amalgamated after 290 years of existence, with The Queen’s Regiment to form The Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment (Queen’s and Royal Hampshires).

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